Updated at 20:51,24-11-2020

People Injuired During People’s Ultimatum March Show Their Bad Wounds

Belarusfeed

People Injuired During People’s Ultimatum March Show Their Bad Wounds
On Sunday, 25 October, after allowing protesters to march through Minsk largely unimpeded, in the evening, unknown men in helmets, balaclavas, with strobe lights and truncheons used stun grenades and chased people through courtyards on Orlovskaya Street. The next day Minsk police chief Ivan Kubrakov said that security forces had taken “measures to suppress illegal actions” – special means and physical force. The Interior Ministry reported two injured police officers.

According to Healthcare Ministry, 13 people with injuries of various levels of severity have sought medical care, of which five were hospitalized in the last 24 hours. However, it didn’t specify whether people were injured during the protests or as a result of the actions of the security forces.

Healthcare workers explain that since during hospitalization, personal data of injured patients brought by ambulance to hospitals are automatically passed to the law enforcement agencies, some people refuse to be hospitalized or do not go to clinics at all.

Freelance video editor Nikita told TUT.BY that he believe a stun grenade fragment hit his left leg near Orlovskaya Street on the evening of 25 October. The guy says that at some point the security forces started throwing stun grenades at people’s feet.

On Sunday, 25 October, after allowing protesters to march through Minsk largely unimpeded, in the evening, unknown men in helmets, balaclavas, with strobe lights and truncheons used stun grenades and chased people through courtyards on Orlovskaya Street. The next day Minsk police chief Ivan Kubrakov said that security forces had taken “measures to suppress illegal actions” – special means and physical force. The Interior Ministry reported two injured police officers.

According to Healthcare Ministry, 13 people with injuries of various levels of severity have sought medical care, of which five were hospitalized in the last 24 hours. However, it didn’t specify whether people were injured during the protests or as a result of the actions of the security forces.

Healthcare workers explain that since during hospitalization, personal data of injured patients brought by ambulance to hospitals are automatically passed to the law enforcement agencies, some people refuse to be hospitalized or do not go to clinics at all.

Freelance video editor Nikita told TUT.BY that he believe a stun grenade fragment hit his left leg near Orlovskaya Street on the evening of 25 October. The guy says that at some point the security forces started throwing stun grenades at people’s feet.

Warning: graphic content.



“I didn’t feel pain, there were just flashes. The guy next to me was falling down, he was completely disoriented, I started to lift him, helped him to walk a little – everything was in a fog.”

Nikita said that he did not immediately notice the wound on his leg, he did not sought medical care. A stranger girl who was nearby at that moment, by coincidence she was a nurse, dressed the wound and later at home he bandaged it again.

Individual entrepreneur Dmitry says that he was injuried in the same area too. He says he was shot in the back with a rubber bullet. However, it remains unclear whether the wound was inflicted with a rubber bullet or a piece of a stun grenade that exploded nearby.

“Grenades exploded under my feet, I was half-shocked, when ringing in my ears stopped, I felt that something was wrong with my back. I touched it with my hand and saw blood.”



The man says he did not go to doctors and is not planning to.

“In principle, I feel well, so I probably won’t go to the doctors. I dressed the wound, taped it up, it doesn’t hurt now. I don’t know what will happen next, but the bruise is impressive, it covers half of my back.”

Minsker Alexander says that yesterday he was in an apartment on Novovilenskaya Street, where people were hiding from security forces. According to the interlocutor, when they told the men to go outside, he was one of the first to do it.



“I thought there was no point in hiding behind the backs. When I went down the stairs [the apartment was either on the second or third floor, the man recalls], they stood on each staircase and beat me on the body with a truncheon.”



When on the street, the man ran behind the building, slipped on the grass and one of the law enforcement officers started hitting him in the head.

“Blood poured immediately. They twisted my arms, beat me on my body a bit, but they didn’t hit me in the head anymore, they got scared along the way, because the head trauma was substantial. They put me in a “glass cell” in a paddy wagon. I was standing on my knees in the gym in the Pervomaisky District Department of Internal Affairs,” he says.



An ambulance took the man from the police department to the 5th clinical hospital in Minsk. According to Alexander, two more people were taken by ambulance. The report from the hospital indicated that the man had a bruised wound in the parietal region, multiple contussions and bruises of the chest, upper and lower extremities.